Top Mets Turkeys Of All Time (Part Two)

Yesterday we covered part one of  the all-time Mets Turkeys, those Mets who were supposed to do great things but didn’t.   Today we cover part two, once again in no particular order.

Bobby Valentine.  Don’t buy into this revisionist history that V is a great manager.  If you want your team to finish second then hire him.   V makes the list because he never had the Mets prepared.   Every season they would dig a big hole in April, be something like 8 games back, and then have to scratch and claw the rest of the season just to hope to play a one game play-in with the Reds to then be the Wild Card.    It’s a drain on players when you can’t rest anyone because every game after May 1st is a must-win.   The season goes a lot easier if you have a big lead unless you are our next turkey…

Willie Randolph.   Go over to some Yankees blog if you want to wax poetic on this guy.   He managed the biggest choke job in history and then dug a hole for the 2008 Mets that ended with the worst stadium closing of all-time.   Omar should have fired him last winter when that other guy from Brooklyn was available.  I think he’s in Los Angeles now, I heard something about him making the playoffs….again.

Mickey Lolich.   Here’s some data I grabbed off wikipedia that will tell you the story.  What it doesn’t tell you is that he was 8-13 for the Mets, and hated New York so much that he sat out 1977 (opened a donut shop and then rejoined baseball in 1978).

Lolich ranks among the Tigers’ all time leaders in many categories, including the following:
  • 2,679 strikeouts is #1 on the Tigers all time list
  • 39 shutouts is #1 on the Tigers all time list
  • 459 games started is #1 on the Tigers all time list
  • 329 home runs allowed is #1 on the Tigers all time list
  • 109 wild pitches is #2 on the Tigers all time list (behind Jack Morris)
  • 207 wins is #3 on the Tigers all time list (behind Hooks Dauss and George Mullin)
  • 508 games is #3 on the Tigers all time list (behind John Hiller and Hooks Dauss)
  • 3,361 innings pitched is #3 on Tigers all time list (behind George Mullin and Hooks Dauss)

Juan Samuel.  Look at the picture of Lenny Dykstra in a Phillies uniform.  Feel the pain.   They traded a beloved CFer and another beloved player in Roger McDowell, two of the key 1986 Mets for Juan Samuel.  Sammy played 86 games for the Mets and hit .226   Dykstra was an All-Star and flirted with .400 for a while.

Victor Zambrano.   Ah Victor, we surrendered Scott Kazmir for you.  Well, we didn’t, the Mets did.  Any fat blogger worth his salt wouldn’t have made that trade.  


Devil Rays GM Chuck Lamar told ESPN Radio Friday night that he lamented giving up Zambrano, but felt Kazmir was too good to pass up.

“It was a good trade for us, and I think it was a heck of a trade for the New York Mets,” Lamar said. “Victor Zambrano has been here a long time. … You hate to give him up but we’ve spent a lot of time and effort and money of getting a nucleus of our young position players. We knew this day was coming that we needed to start getting our hands on some pitching that can truly beat the Red Sox and Yankees in this division, and we think Scott Kazmir has that kind of ability.”

The Mets went 71-91.   Scott Kazmir…you know the story.

Did we forget any turkeys?  Hit comments.

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Top Mets Turkeys Of All Time (Part One)

On this Turkey Day we celebrate the great Mets turkeys of all time.   Those who promised greatness and gave us nothing.  In no particular order…

Generation K:  I think it was best put by a friend of mine (whose brain I picked for this article) who said “Pulsipher, Isringhuasen and The Other Guy.”   Yep, these three pitchers were going to dominate the 1990s.  Izzy had a decent career somewhere else, Pulse was a mess, and you’re still trying to remember the other guy’s name.   At least Generation K weren’t saddled by horrible black uniforms for this picture.

Kaz Matsui:  The Yankees have a Matsui, we should get one too!   This was the height of the Japanese obsession where the Mets would sign Shinjo and “The Japanese Greg Maddux” rather than get the real guys.

Speaking of the Japanese Greg Maddux, that’s him on the left.   I will tell you his name Saturday to (a) torture you and (b) give myself a generic post I can write on Wednesday night so I don’t have to blog over turkey.

Bobby Bonilla.   We’ve covered this many times.   Great with Bonds, horrible with Mets.   One of the most hated Mets of all time, so what do the Mets do?  They bring him back for a second time so we can boo him more.  He didn’t make it to the final game at Shea.

Joe Foy.   You don’t know who he is.   He’s the Bobby Bonilla of 1970.  You kids won’t believe it now but the Mets could never find a good third-baseman, so they traded for one.   He hit .236.   The player they gave up was Amos Otis who played until 1984 and went to the playoffs numerous times for the Royals.  Foy was done after 1971.

Roberto Alomar.   At one point he was a lock for the Hall of Fame.  It was plausible that he was going to be the greatest second baseman of all-time.  He hit .336 with 20 and 100 in the pre-steroids 2001.   In 2002 he joins the Mets and .266 with 11 home runs.   Robby fell so far he wond up on the Long Island Ducks

Tomorrow, part two!

Mets Share Great Ticket Secret With The World (With Service Charge)

I’m sure it’s a coincidence but right after Metspolice.com asks why the Mets are hiding their ticket plans from the world, suddenly they’ve announced them!

First major offense is this:  Note: A $25 service charge will apply to each Plan purchase.

Why?  Mets answer us!   Why do you have to tackle on $25?   What possibly justifies this?  Perhaps you need it to offset the $20 million in taxpayer money you will decline to take from Citigroup?  Maybe you’re just greedy bastards.

I also see that if Mets Police Junior and I want a ticket plan it’s going to cost us $600.  

Some “highlights” below.

40 Game “A” Plan
This plan includes every-other regular season game to be played at Citi Field, starting April 15.

Seat Categories:
 Note: A $25 service
 charge will apply to
 each Plan purchase.
Metropolitan Box $5,970 per seat (Left Field Restaurant access included)
Excelsior Club Gold $5,970 per seat (Excelsior Club access included)
Field Box $4,975 per seat (Left Field Restaurant access included)
Baseline Box $2,985 per seat  
Excelsior Club $2,985 per seat (Excelsior Club access included)
Promenade Club $2,388 per seat (Promenade Club access included)
Left Field Reserved $1,990 per seat


5 Game Friday Plan
This plan includes ten (10) Friday and five (5) weekday regular season games to be played at Citi Field -starting April 17- and features matchups with the Yankees and the American League Champion Tampa Bay Rays.

Seat Categories:
 Note: A $25 service
 charge will apply to
 each Plan purchase.
Left Field Landing $600 per seat
Promenade Box $525 per seat
Promenade Reserved Infield $375 per seat
Promenade Reserved $285 per seat

Click here to display the Plan dates & opponents »

 15 Game Saturday Plan
This plan includes ten (10) Saturday and five (5) weekday regular season games to be played at Citi Field -starting April 18- and features contests with the Yankees and Rays, the National League Central Champion Cubs and the N.L. Wild Card Brewers.

Seat Categories:
 Note: A $25 service
 charge will apply to
 each Plan purchase.
Left Field Landing $600 per seat
Promenade Box $525 per seat
Promenade Reserved Infield $375 per seat
Promenade Reserved $285 per seat

Click here to display the Plan dates & opponents »

 15 Game Sunday Plan
This plan includes ten (10) Sunday and five (5) weekday regular season games to be played at Citi Field -starting April 16- and is highlighted by the 2009 regular season Subway Series finale and games with the Cubs and Brewers.

Seat Categories:
 Note: A $25 service
 charge will apply to
 each Plan purchase.
Left Field Landing $624 per seat
Promenade Box $546 per seat
Promenade Reserved Infield $390 per seat
Promenade Reserved $297 per seat

Click here to display the Plan dates & opponents »

 15 Game Weekend Plan
This plan includes three (3) Friday, three (3) Saturday, three (3) Sunday, and six (6) weekday regular season games to be played at Citi Field -starting April 15- and features three battles with the Phillies plus matchups with the N.L. West Champion Dodgers, Cubs, Rays, and ending with the final regular season game against the Astros.

Seat Categories:
 Note: A $25 service
 charge will apply to
 each Plan purchase.
Left Field Landing $648 per seat
Promenade Box $567 per seat
Promenade Reserved Infield $405 per seat
Promenade Reserved $309 per seat

Click here to display the Plan dates & opponents »

 15 Game Weekday Plan
This plan includes Opening Day and 14 other weekday regular season games to be played at Citi Field -starting April 13- and features three games each with the division-rival Phillies and Atlanta Braves, and a contest with the Dodgers.

Seat Categories:
 Note: A $25 service
 charge will apply to
 each Plan purchase.
Left Field Landing $568 per seat
Promenade Box $497 per seat
Promenade Reserved Infield $355 per seat
Promenade Reserved $269 per seat

Click here to display the Plan dates & opponents »

Citi Storm Coming Mets Way

Hey Mets, I warned you Monday to get out in front of this one.  Return the $20M for the first year (take it on the back end) and make some “noble” statement about jobs and the economy and the holidays blah blah.
 
There’s a PR storm coming, and it’s going to wind up being something like “Mets Pay Big Free Agent $20M in Bailout Funds, Citigroup lays off 50,000 at Christmas.”
 
Here’s a roundup of today’s stormwatch:
 
 
Two New York City Council members say that Citigroup should show its thanks for a federal bailout by sharing the naming rights to the new Mets ballpark in Queens.
 
 

Here is what CFO Gary Crittendon had to say about it Monday on CNBC:

“That was a decision made in a different time. We have binding legal agreements… I don’t think it’s an issue.”

 

So let’s follow the money here: The government gives funds to Citigroup, who is now better able to make an annual payment to the Mets. Sounds a bit like a new taxpayer subsidy for the Mets, who are already receiving government subsidies for building their stadium.

 

Yes Gary, it is impossible to renegotiate any contract with a partner in trouble.   It has never been done.

 
 
That $20 million per year – which, by the way, the Mets don’t seem all that eager to invest in the free-agent market despite another dismal late-season collapse – is coming out of your paycheck and mine, funneled through the federal government to the failed executives of Citigroup, and ultimately winds up in Fred Wilpon’s pocket.

This amounts to not only the worst kind of corporate welfare, with no punishments meted out and no strings attached, it also adds up to 20 years of free advertising for a bank with nothing to brag about but a vault full of fail.

 
This is just the latest chapter in two sorry histories, the first being that of the U.S. banking industry and the second being that of the New York Mets.

For all the hand-wringing about the way the Yankees go about their business, it is really the Mets, the “little brothers” in town, who are the most fan-hostile organization in New York sports.

 
 
Those are the words of Wallace Matthews.  Amen brother!
 
 
 
 
 

Who is #41?

Man we're getting old. The cool chick in the office (she likes baseball and Galactica, although she's a Bosox fan) comes into my office and admires the photo I have up. It's two baseball players standing on a pitchers mound with their backs to us. The younger one wears #31 and she immediately recognized him.

She asks me, "Who's 41?"

I couldn't believe it. Who's 41???? Tom Seaver!

She wasn't impressed. The name meant nothing to her.

"He was even on the Sox. He was sitting in your dugout when you lost in 1986!"

She just said, "I was five" and left.

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